Posts Tagged ‘ interior decorator ’

I made these newels for a customer in Tennessee. They are indeed in poplar and came out fine I think. The large N108 is 8 inches wide at the base and the N107’s are 5 1/2 inches wide at the base.

Large Newels

Large Newels

large newels

large newels

These six newels are my N112 newels from Architectural Turnings. The customer wanted them in Brazilian Cherry (also called Jatoba). The largest is 5 1/2inches by 48 inches. The smaller newels are 3 1/2 inches X 48 inches

Jatoba Barley twisted newels

Jatoba Barley twisted newels

These were ordered from a repeat customer in Mass. The twists are called rope twists as opposed to the more popular barley twists. Since the balusters were tapered I recommended the shallower rope twist. There are around 220 balusters for two stairways in this home. I hope to get pictures of the finished project. They usually do a beautiful job.

alternating balusters

These are in soft maple.

This is a new design I am adding to my site. I will offer it in a 7″ and a 5 1/2″ version – fluting or plain.

n105_fluted_lrg2

This is my first real stab and trying to make the newels photo realistic. I definitely have some work to do but not bad I think.

rendered_newels

I’ve been working on my 3D modeling and rendering and want to create some newel designs. OK the modeling is coming along but I have lots of work to do as for rendering. I’m having fun with the modeling at least. The image below is my shot at developing a tapered newel with the option of fluting. I like the simplicity of the design but am unsettled about how much taper to use – extreme taper or slight. Hope you like the colors.

tapered newel

These are of course over-the-post newels and require a newel cap that will match the handrail profile.

These newels were popular in the New Orleans area. We call them double bells because of the stacked bell motif obviously. It is a design I like but really don’t make that often. People have not been requesting them.

The first image (not a good one I know) was sent me from a contractor in Kentucky. I hadn’t seen one of my painted black but there you have it with black iron balusters.

double bell newel

double bell newel

This other image is of red oak double bells. Can’t remember where these went but I like the way they came out.

double-bell-newels


These Victorian newels were created for a custom in California. He at first sent detailed drawings that were too messy to discover the detail. He then sent an original newel for us to copy. The new were hard maple. They turned out nicely.

Victorian newels

Victorian newels

The larger newel is 6″ wide at the base. The smaller newels are three and a half inches.

These are exterior balusters that I reproduced for a customer on the East Coast. They are crafted in Spanish Cedar. Spanish Cedar is an import from South America that has gained in popularity among millworks companies in the US. Twenty years ago mostly boat builders used this wood because of the resistance to decay. I remember seeing SCedar in huge widths and thicknesses and lengths. You can still buy it that way but not as readily. If the smell doesn’t kill you, it is a fine wood for applications exposed to the weather. The downside is its tendency to bleed through the paint. A good oil primer is a plus.

Exterior Baluster

The dark baluster is the original but you already knew that.

Many of my customers have never understood the difference between a barley twist and a rope twisted turning. And though I try to explain it over the phone, I’m certain it is not well understood. “A rope twist”, I tell them, “looks like rope.” A barley twist, on the other hand, has an interior radius that differentiates it from a rope twist. This usually does not work. And so a picture is indeed worth a thousand words. Or this case – two pictures:

barley twist

barley twist

rope twist

rope twist