Archive for the ‘ videos ’ Category

These columns (porch posts) were popular in the US in the 18th and 19th century. The chamfered edges terminate in a “lambs tongue”.
By the way, a chamfer is a beveled edge connecting two surfaces. If the surfaces are at right angles, the chamfer will typically be symmetrical at 45 degrees (def. from wikipedia).
You can see the lamb’s tongue in the still image at the end of the video.
The chamfer and lamb’s tongue were not only commonly used on porch post but also on exposed beams.

I was contracted to turn these large island legs in alder some time back.
Alder is considered by some to be a cherry substitute, I suppose, because it has a pinkish color. That is probably the only common ground between the two species. You might argue that they both have a similar smell. Why would anyone substitute alder for cherry you may ask? Alder is more plentiful and so cheeper. Cherry has been one of America’s classic wood species and, as such, has been overly harvested. Cherry today is more likely to include sap wood because it is harvested from smaller trees (sap wood is whitish in color and contrast sharply with the characteristic pink heart color of cherry – not a desirable trait)

This is a video I produced some time back. We often get a request for alternating stair balusters. The stair balusters alternate between a barley twisted balusters and a plain baluster You can see the final product at the end of the video.

I made these rope twisted columns for a customer in Florida. As you can see they are hollow, turned from staved hollow octagons. By the way that is my youngest son in the picture. The Youtube video has at present over 40,000 views.
The poplar columns were actually designed to be a part of a rather large bed for the customer of my customer. I would have loved to see the final project and to post it but you don’t always get want you want.

rope twisted columns

rope twisted columns

rope twisted columns

rope twisted columns

I love it that I snapped the picture right when my son had received a call.

The Youtube video follows:

In this little video I am turning two different large (2 1/2″) stair balusters. the first was for a customer in Mississippi. I really love the heavy vase shape with the one inch pin tops. They are in poplar.
In the second part of the video we are turning red oak balusters for a customer near New Orleans. The red oak used was from his own property. He had been saving it for some time to use and finally got around to bringing the wood to me. I had turned a similar pattern in 1 3/4″ but modified the pattern to accommodate the larger 2 1/2″ size.


This is a video that I made of balusters we produced for a customer in Illinois.  They are made from Spanish Cedar and are 3 1/2 inches at the squares.